Home Health ‘Planet Lockdown’ spreads unfounded claims about the Covid-19 vaccine and Coronavirus

‘Planet Lockdown’ spreads unfounded claims about the Covid-19 vaccine and Coronavirus

by Eric
Covid-19 vaccine

In the period between the end of December and the beginning of January, the video “Planet Lockdown”, propagating false information regarding the pandemic of Covid-19, attracted over 20 million views on YouTube. In the misinformation piece, there were allegations that vaccines cause infertility and are embedded with microchips.

The video was first brought to public attention by the surveillance group Media Matters for America. In the show, conspiracy theorists make false claims about the pandemic and criticize mitigation measures, according to its creators.

In the period between the end of December and the beginning of January, the video “Planet Lockdown”, propagating false information regarding the pandemic of Covid-19, attracted over 20 million views on YouTube. In the misinformation piece, there were allegations that vaccines cause infertility and are embedded with microchips.

The video was first brought to public attention by the surveillance group Media Matters for America. The creators of the show claim it will be part of a series that will interview conspiracy theorists who dishonestly describe the pandemic and criticize mitigation measures.

According to Fitts, who has no experience in public health or medicine, the Coronavirus vaccine contains “mysterious ingredients” and will “modify your DNA in a way that will make you infertile.”.

An Instagram post by anti-vaccine activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. titled “Planet Lockdown film” received more than 900 views before it was taken down this week. According to Facebook spokeswoman Dani Lever, the video was removed for violating its policies. In order to take appropriate action, we monitor copies and other versions.”

The censorship of Kimon Drakopoulos is sometimes counterproductive, according to the Marshall School of Business professor. Many of the people who have seen the video are already convinced there is a conspiracy. They see the bans as proof that one exists.

Platforms do be more likely to spread this type of misinformation if they limit how much information people see on their news feeds. They are responsible for this. The idea of censorship challenges your business models, but besides being against your business model, you must be socially responsible”, he adds.

In order to create a real analysis, we used the Snowflake Quiz results. Most of the time, you will find funny and flippant questions about the snowflake test.

It is sometimes “backfiring” when social media bans are viewed as proof that a conspiracy actually exists by people who believe false claims. Instead of limiting how much information people see in their news feeds, Drakopoulos suggested platforms should limit how much information people see, making it less likely they’ll see false claims.

Social media platforms thrive off user engagement, so Drakopoulos’ suggestion goes against the business model. However, he said it is necessary to protect the public from misinformation.

“They are responsible for that,” he said. “Censoring articles also runs counter to their business models, but at that point you have to be socially responsible and stick up for your cause.”

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